Prostate cancer: popular high-protein food in your diet may increase risk by 70%

For a long time, experts were unconvinced by the studies supporting the role of dietary choline in cancer prevention. | Photo credit: iStock Images

Highlights

  • The recommended daily intake of choline is around 450 mg/day for an adult. One egg provides less than 150 mg of choline.
  • Choline is found in abundance in eggs – a popular staple in all countries and cultures.
  • Meat, milk and poultry are also rich sources of choline.

New Delhi: Whether it’s a cold or the flu, heart disease or aggressive cancer, diet has an impact on everything. Experts have long said that we are literally what we eat, and for this reason, a healthy, balanced diet is recommended for everyone. Whether they are healthy people or people with underlying health conditions such as high cholesterol, hypertension, diabetes, obesity or other metabolic disorders. In the midst of this, a recent study revealed how seemingly healthy foods, which find a place in our daily diet, could increase the risk of prostate cancer by 70%. Keep reading to find out what it is.

Food and cancer: the link explained

For a long time, experts were unconvinced by the studies supporting the role of dietary choline in cancer prevention. On the one hand, while many believe that not consuming enough of it is linked to an increased risk of life-threatening health problems. And on the other hand, according to a study, it has been proven that a high intake of the same nutrient can increase the risk of fatal prostate cancer by 70%. Study experts revealed that choline is found in high concentrations in prostate cancer cells; blood concentration can further increase the risk of cancer.

This was supported in part by Dr. Murad Lala – Consultant and Head of Surgical Oncology at PD Hinduja National Hospital & Research Centre. The expert, interacting with Times Now Digital, revealed the safe daily amount of choline an adult needs and the amount found in just one egg.

“Choline is an essential nutrient that plays a vital role in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell membrane, is important for neurotransmission and early brain development, and is also involved in modulating gene expression. . The recommended daily intake of choline is around 450 mg/day for an adult. One egg provides less than 150 mg of choline. To say that a healthy diet can increase the risk of aggressive prostate cancer by 70% is sensationalizing a fact not proven by an observational study. A healthy diet in moderation, even if it involves eggs and meat, will have far more beneficial effects than worrying about increasing the risk of prostate cancer,” Dr Lala said.

Choline is found in abundance in eggs – a popular staple in all countries and cultures. A high intake corresponds to exceeding 500 mg of choline per day – the recommended daily for men; while women can stick to 424mg. Meat, milk and poultry are also rich sources of choline.

Is choline the only factor responsible for the risk of prostate cancer?

Experts then commented on the study that attributed prostate cancer risk to choline intake and said nutrient levels were tested in patients after they were diagnosed. This means that for the past 10 to 15 years, what they ate and their lifestyle was not taken into consideration at all. Therefore, it is not entirely possible to fully attribute the risk of cancer to any particular food.

Additionally, studies have also cited a strong link between a diet high in saturated fat and an elevated risk of aggressive prostate cancer. Saturated fats can raise bad cholesterol levels, which further increases the risk of aggressive cancer.

This effect, however, can be reversed by sticking to a plant-based diet—fruits, vegetables, nuts, and seeds—and exercising regularly.

Sources of Dietary Choline

Besides eggs, choline is found in the following foods:

  1. organ meat
  2. Caviar
  3. Beef
  4. red potatoes
  5. Chicken
  6. Turkey
  7. Almonds
  8. quinoa
  9. Red beans
  10. Broccoli
  11. Cauliflower
  12. Soy

Disclaimer: The tips and suggestions mentioned in the article are provided for general information only and should not be construed as professional medical advice. Always consult your doctor or dietitian before starting any fitness program or making any changes to your diet.


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Tanya S. Norvell